Survey: Only 27 Percent Know What a Bi-Fold Door Is

September 18th, 2017 by Editor

A new survey shows that bi-fold door companies could be losing out on thousands of potential sales because customers are searching online for the wrong product.

Origin, a manufacturer of aluminum bi-fold doors, conducted a study in which it showed 925 members of the public a picture of a bi-fold door and asked them to say what kind of door it was. Only 27 percent of respondents answered correctly, indicating that almost three quarters of the public does not know what a bi-fold door is.

With so much product research carried out online prior to purchasing an item, it makes sense to enure that a product is easy to find. Unfortunately, when customers are unsure of the exact name of a product, they may end up searching for the wrong item entirely, resulting in thousands of fruitless searches each month.

“Consumers often describe products differently depending on the state, or country, they’re from,” says Joe Halsall, the marketing director with Origin in Buckinghamshire, England. “This is something which we can clearly see from our research. It is important for companies to understand the popularity of terms for their own marketing efforts as a failure to do so could result in leaving customers behind to go to your rivals.”

The results of the survey in full are as follows:

“Folding glass” was the most popular answer on the survey, attracting 39 percent of respondents. The second-most-popular answer was “accordion,” which got 31.5 percent of the voting share.

Probably the biggest surprise of the entire survey was the fact that “bi-fold doors” got over 27 percent of the response. This is not a traditionally common way to describe the door in the USA, but the survey suggests that it is growing in popularity.

The last significant term used was “French,” which was voted for by 13.7 percent of respondents.

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