Industry Indices Jun/Jul 2018

June 28th, 2020 by Nathan Hobbs

Markets

AAMA Study Sees Growth on the Horizon for Doors, Windows and Skylights

The demand for prime windows in the U.S. improved by 3.6 percent in 2017, driven by continued strong new housing demand, according to the recently released 2017/2018 Study of the U.S. Market for Windows, Doors and Skylights from the American Architectural Manufacturers Association. The market for windows in new housing increased by just under 6 percent in 2017, with increases of 10 and 4 percent predicted for the next two years as the housing recovery continues. Meanwhile, replacement window demand increased modestly again, by 2 percent in 2017, with growth in this segment also likely to be improved in 2018 amid strong remodeling spending.

The 2017 market for residential entry doors in the U.S. has grown since 2015. An overall increase of approximately 5 percent is expected for 2018.

Residential skylights closed the year with a growth rate of 4 percent over 2016 volume. New-construction skylight activity was up 7 percent, while remodeling and replacement skylight activity was up 3 percent compared to 2016.

Remodeling

Houzz: Strong Outlook for Renovation Pros in 2018

The 2018 Houzz U.S. State of the Industry report finds that companies across all sectors in the residential renovation and design industry anticipate revenue growth in 2018 following positive results in 2017.

The majority of companies surveyed have a positive outlook for 2018 (71 percent to 88 percent). Those in construction-focused groups are particularly optimistic, with 36 to 44 percent having “a very good” outlook for the year. Companies across industry groups also anticipate demand for their services to improve (65 to 70 percent) and expect an average revenue rate of growth of seven to 12 percent in 2018.

Report: Remodeling Spending to Keep Growing into 2019

Spending on renovations will grow more than 7 percent into 2019 and will exceed $340 billion annually, according to the Leading Indicator of Remodeling Activity (LIRA) from Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies.

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