The conversation on natural light was ongoing throughout the week on the Greenbuild 2014 show room floor in New Orleans. The show ended yesterday and DWM’s sister publication, USGlass, was there to cover all the news from the event, including doors and windows, skylights and glass.

While showcasing the environmental aspect of their respective products, glass- and fenestration-related exhibitors also stressed the significance of daylighting as part of the green building movement.

SageGlass announced its product will now be available in large architectural sizes without a center bus bar. Units with no center bus bar may also be equipped with LightZone, enabling maximum control and daylighting.
SageGlass announced its product will now be available in large architectural sizes without a center bus bar. Units with no center bus bar may also be equipped with LightZone, enabling maximum control and daylighting.

CPI Daylighting sales representative Kevin Haslauer says studies have proven the positive effects of natural daylight, from improved test scores in educational facilities to better attendance and higher levels of productivity in work settings.

In its own efforts to bring more natural light into buildings and reduce energy usage, Velux showed its various versions of skylights for both residential and non-residential applications.

The company featured its solar powered fresh air skylight, which is solar-venting. Velux executive marketing representative Kanishka Kapil explained the concept of the “stack effect,” which is utilized by Velux’s product.

“If you crack a skylight, air rises and it pulls the air through the skylight… it’s like free air conditioning,” he says, adding that in Denmark, where the company is headquartered, AC isn’t used a whole lot, so “this is one of the ways they ventilate a building.”

“And in an AC climate, you can release the trapped hot air in a building,” he adds. “You can just open these up for two minutes, shut it, and now your AC is cooling cool air instead of trying to cool the hot air of the building.”

Glass played a huge role at Greenbuild as well. View had its dynamic glass installed upstairs in a room above the exposition floor to demonstrate its thermochromic technology. View’s Brandon Tinianov says his company’s technology is “centered around the user,” with occupancy comfort, productivity and health key focuses. He says the sectors in which View’s thermochromic glass is the most popular are healthcare, government and higher education.

Window manufacturers, such as Andersen and Marvin,, were also on hand to showcase their latest offerings. Show visitors were also able to see Andersen Windows installed in the 2014 Greenbuild LivingHome. The 1,550 square foot, three-bedroom, two-bath modular Greenbuild LivingHome meets LEED v4 Platinum requirements.

Andersen’s 100 Series products were installed in the home. The doors and windows are made of the company’s Fibrex material and are SCS certified for pre-consumer recycled content and indoor air quality. Fibrex material is a wood composite containing 60 percent polymers and 40 percent pre-consumer reclaimed wood fiber from the company’s manufacturing process.

“We are proud that our 100 Series windows could contribute to the green building objectives of the LivingHome,” said Eliza Clark, manager of sustainability at Andersen. “This project is closely aligned with our company’s commitment to advancing sustainability in residential construction to build and foster healthy, affordable and resilient communities.”

The home will be permanently placed on a Make It Right site in New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward to become part of Make It Right’s ongoing Katrina recovery efforts.

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